Olympus III

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I’d like to ride this!

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Olympus II

Film I

After a month of absence from here, I am back with some new, fresh photos! And not any old photos, no. I’ve been getting the second and third roll of film developed that I’ve shot with my granddad’s old camera. I must say, at times I really like the colours this film gives me! Best example is the picture above – awesome colours! If anything like this came out of my digital.. wow, I don’t think I’d ever sell that camera again. Which I’m currently thinking about.. But I guess more news on that will come anytime soon in the next month : ) So long…

PS: No adjustments whatsoever!

Olympus 35SP

Olympus 35SP

Another trip into analog again. This one’s from my grandfathers Olympus 35SP which is the left one in the picture from my post „Flexora„. It has a 43mm 1.7 which shows very nicely in terms of depth of field when shooting a close-up.

The picture above is only scanned and otherwise unprocessed. Unfortunately, my dealer did a very bad job of scanning the negatives. The whole film looks over-sharpened and the files are mostly <1 MB small. Not much for a full 35mm negative in my opinion. Maybe, I’ll get it scanned again somehwere else with better quality. But till then I’ll enjoy the great colours this scan provides.

Flexora

Flexora

This one is from my cute little Flexora 6×6 TLR.

A TLR is a Twin Lens Reflex camera, meaning that it has two lenses: one through which you look and one you take the pictures through. It is an analog camera that takes up to 10 exposures on one 120 format roll film. Addition: The one in the middle.

Unbenanntes_Panorama1tnIt is quite an experience to work with this kind of camera because it handles completely unlike a modern (D)SLR. Plus you have to consider before every exposure: 1. control your settings and 2. really decide whether your subject is worth it. Because getting a film developed and scanned can easily cost about 20€ in my area (maybe my dealer is a hustler). That equals about 2€/picture and you also have to buy the film itself, of course. But on the other hand, that’s what makes it exciting! You really have to think about what you’re doing and not click away madly.

If you ever get an analog camera from your grandparents, maybe, or from a flea market, give it a try! 😉